Can I slow down the aging process to ease my way into becoming elderly? Join me on this journey.

Does a newly-minted 35-year-old son want to know that his dad is really proud of him?

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Our son-Justin-is 35-years old tomorrow.  I want him to know that I'm really proud of him and the man he has become.  He's an amazing husband and father.  For more than two-years, he and my son-in-law, Adam Jones and my longtime friend Ken Alexander, have been meeting online to talk and pray together.  We've become a band of brothers.

What needs to be called out is his solid love for his wife Lauren and his two kids Miles and Eloise and for his parents and everybody else who comes across his path.  But in front of his love for them is his love for God.  That governs everything in his life.  I'm not saying he's perfect and that I've put him on a pedestal.  

He "Remembers Who He Is."  That being a truly loved child of God.  That's where his hope comes from.  I pray that will never change.

I could go on and on about all the different stuff we've done together, all the cappuccinos we drank together, all the grocery shopping we did together, all the craft beer we've drunk, not to mention the wine and coffee, all the golf we played, all the Promise Keepers we attended together all over the country, the time we spent in prison one night, as well as a momentous visit of the college he attended and graduated from.  Then there was the time, I was his best man at his wedding to Lauren.

I know he knows I'm proud of him.  I just wanted to put it on the record.

Happy Birthday Son.  


Listen to this woman with Parkinsons and how she deals with the loss of her voice

I have a new hero, at least for today.  She's a Parkinson's patient who dealt with a serious loss in her voice.  When she spoke she had trouble making herself heard, particularly with her grandkids.  Her diminished voice resulted in less human interaction.  She talked a lot less.

I've found myself in the same position.  My Parkinson's has greatly affected my once powerful voice to nothing more than a weak whisper at least for part of the day.  I get really frustrated when I can't make myself understood.

The experience has given me a whole new level of appreciation for people with speech challenges.

To combat this I took intensive training with a speech therapist in a program called LSVT Loud designed for people with Parkinson's.  

Did it help?  Yes.  It gave a couple of tools to use to strengthen my voice and put more power behind it.  I'm still a work in progress.

Listen to this short video and listen to her second set of "ah's."  Check how long she holds the ah's.  Pretty impressive.  She's a star.  And then listen to her conversational voice.

That's what I'm aiming for.


How many of you switch sides of the bed overnight with your mate?

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We've done it all our married life, almost 38 years.  During the middle of the night when I get up to pee, we switch sides of the bed.  For me, it would seem strange to wake up on my side of the bed.

When we told our married kids that, they seemed to think that's really a strange habit.  Like how can our brains handle the switch of positions?  It's better than taking the natural sleep aid melatonin.

There's something comforting about changing sleep positions.  My sleeping psyche sees the world from a different position.

How many of you own your sleep positions and would change for nothing and no one?  You have your side and you laid claim to it early on.


At what age do you become elderly?

Baby-boomers and others:  I am a member of the first class of baby-boomers, meaning I was born in 1946.  I turn 73 this year.  Am I elderly?  To check, I went to the source of information for questions like these, Google.  

It said, "Most developed world countries have accepted the chronological age of 65 years as a definition of 'elderly' or older person, but like many westernized concepts, this does not adapt well to the situation in Africa."  And you go down the search engine results and you quickly see there's no standard definition of elderly.  But they seem to center around being more than 60.

For me, it's going to take some getting used to this definition.  It's a word with power and suggests canes, walkers, doctors and nursing homes.  I accept the fact that I'm the patriarch of our family.  I've kidded family members that means because of my age I've made more mistakes than them.

What about you?  Got any problems being called elderly?

 

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What it’s like two months after receiving my diagnosis for Parkinson’s Disease

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I still feel like a deer on a Michigan highway that’s standing in the middle of the road late at night.  You see them standing there staring at you as you barrel down the road.  They don’t move.

It’s been two months since I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease and my life has changed.  First, the diagnosis has done wonders for my prayer life.  I’m in constant contact with God, Jesus and the Holy Spirit.  It’s like I have them on speed dial.

My once strong voice has become a whisper on many occasions.  I had a voice that could be heard in the other room.  I could never whisper comfortably for fear that somebody would hear me talking.  I now have to practice talking in a coffee shop environment like a Starbucks where there’s music.

I’m stooped over when I walk.  I have to consciously remind myself to pull my shoulders back.  My back hurts more and I have a Parkinson’s shuffle when I walk.  I have to tell myself that I need to walk heel to toe.

So what’s the answer?

God has become more real to me.  I know that he speaks to me through the Bible and I try to read each verse listening for what he says to me.  This is particularly true of the Psalms which are prayers and songs.

Have I asked God to heal me?  You bet.  There’s a good likelihood that he won’t.  Will he be with me as I walk through this?  I am counting on that.  Will he be with my wife Gladys as my caregiver?  I see him everyday in her and how she love me.

What about Rock Steady Boxing for Parkinson’s patients which is non-contact?  You learn all the moves and the discipline of boxing and you participate in all the fitness programs.  

Because of a brain tumor in the back of my head, the neurologist hasn’t cleared me yet.  They are trying to eliminate vascular Parkinson’s.

What about the above picture with the decibel meter on my wife’s iPhone?  We split a small coffee at a nearby Starbucks and measured how loud I’d have to be for somebody to hear me across our small table.

How’d I do?

Poorly.  It feels like I’m shouting to be heard.  My wife says not to worry.  I’m not there yet.

More to come.  


I should probably warn our neighbors that the noise is coming from me

 

 

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I graduated from my special speech therapy program for Parkinson's Disease patients on Friday.  My speech therapist Nicole led me through LSVT-Loud designed especially for people whose voices have been reduced to a whisper like mine had.  We met for an hour a day for four days a week with homework each day with two times a day on weekends.

For me, the most frustrating part of having Parkinson's so far has been being reduced to having a voice that couldn't be heard on the other end of the couch.  I felt trapped in being able to communicate with anybody, including my wife, my kids and my grandkids.  At church we sat in the very back row to avoid having to talk to anybody.  At a fast food restaurant, my wife would order and at a restaurant with a waitstaff, I would tell the waitperson that "I'd take the same as her" pointing to my wife.

Nicole ran me through a variety of exercises everyday which had me belting "Ahh's" going up and down the scale.  She took decibel readings each time to let me know where I stood.

I moved on to phrases and then to reading whole sections of copy, including a book.  I learned about breathing and how to "Think LOUD."  

What now?  I have to practice everyday to keep my voice in shape.  As a Parkinson's person, I have vocal chords that need to be recalibrated often, at least everyday.  I haven't gotten all the way back, but I can see it on the horizon.  I've been given the tools.

Nicole, you've been a world-changer for me.  And to Gladys, my wife, you've been beside me through all this.  You're my world-changer too.

I'm on the way towards getting this under control and I praise our Almighty God for that.

 


Watch Kirk Gibson talk about his Parkinson's Disease

This week I graduate from an intense four-week program for Parkinson's patients who have lost a lot of their voice.  This video shows how Kirk Gibson, a MSU football legend handled his Parkinson's Disease, including his ability to talk loudly and clearly.  He's a graduate of the same program.  About 10 minutes into the video, he talks about how he moved from being a Major League Baseball manager to somebody who had trouble producing anything more than a whisper.

He practices his "ah's" everyday to maintain his voice just to do everyday life.  For me, the toughest part of this journey has been losing my ability to communicate.  I first thought I was having a stroke, at least,  a TIA.  

Then the neurologist who diagnosed me suggested I go through the LSVT Loud program with a speech therapist.  It's helping.  I'm not ready to give a TED talk, but who knows, I might get to that point.

What would I talk about?  My wife who I couldn't do Parkinson's without her.  My family who have been tremendously supportive.  My grandkids.  Then there's God who promises to walk beside me throughout this thing.


How do you not let Parkinsons Disease take over your life?

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It started just as a simple cup of coffee after my special speech therapy for Parkinson's patients.  While sipping our dark roast at Panera on Dobie Road in Okemos, we talked about my PD diagnosis that was made just about a month ago.  

We both nodded our heads about how we have a new normal in our lives.  My usual loud and low voice can quickly degrade into a somewhat loud whisper and I walk with a real stoop.  I shuffle my feet using short steps and I'm using a walking stick to help counteract that.

The disease is something that's always there.  It could easily shroud every part of our lives.  How do you keep that from happening?

The goal is to compartmentalize.  As much as possible, give the disease the time it needs and then put it back in the pigeonhole.  

I caught myself sitting on our deck with my head down and getting depressed.  The meds made me nauseated and kept me from enjoying my grandkids.  I tried to be proactive and give myself a half hour to feel down.  Then I switched gears and thanked God for everything I had, especially family.

How would I evaluate my efforts to challenge the disease?  It's a work in progress.

 

 


Getting back into the conversations of daily life with Parkinson's Disease

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Most Saturday nights when we go to the services at Trinity Church in Lansing, I avoid verbal communication with just about everybody, except my wife.  Why?  My Parkinson's Disease (PD) has reduced the volume of my voice to just about a whisper and a strained one at that.  With PD, I've found myself withdrawing more and more from everyday verbal communication.

I found myself becoming more and more socially isolated where I only felt comfortable talking with my wife Gladys.  This reduced me to Facebook conversations where I talked with my fingertips.

Then Dr. Sidropoulos who diagnosed me responded by writing a script for me to get special speech therapy for PD patients.  It's called LSVT Loud.  The therapy sessions concentrate on building breath strength through a variety of exercises under the tutelage of my therapist Nicole.  She's incredibly patient and knowledgeable.

It took a couple of sessions to get the point of how much my voice strength had deteriorated and that when I went through my "ahhh. . ." exercises that 80 decibels was not screaming.

So, is it working?  I've asked my wife and others if they had any trouble understanding me since I've started therapy.  Their responses have been an encouragement big time.  I'm starting to feel more empowered to jump back into conversations, rather than avoid them, especially with one set of grandkids coming for our Easter celebration.  I look forward to reading books with them again.

My wife helps me with my homework at the kitchen table.  If you're standing on our deck and you hear screaming, you'll know what it is. Actually, my therapist says my perception of loudness will change as my brain reprograms itself.

Next week:  Boxing for Parkinson's patients and maybe a support group. Goal is to beat the disease and not give it more of a chance to beat me.


How do I feel one week after being diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease?

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I wish I would have paid closer attention in my high school and community college biology classes back in the sixties.  As I move far along in my seventies I realize that my body is being challenged by old age.  

When my physical therapist evaluated me earlier this year, he asked me if I had ever been evaluated for Parkinson's Disease.  One of my M.D.s asked if I wanted a referral for a neurologist.  I'm glad I did.

I was diagnosed exactly a week ago.  Since then I've experienced various emotions.  My wife says, it's part of my new normal.  I feel like a deer in the headlights late at night on a Michigan highway.  I'm not sure I know which way to move or if I really want to.

So far, I've started the Parkinson's meds to restore dopamine to my neurons to help  all sorts of body functions.  I've developed a severe stoop when I walk most of the time.  I have trouble getting off soft chairs and couches and I've had a problem with severe constipation during the past few years.

My declining voice which has been reduced to a whisper most of the time has been a real problem.  Used to have a low voice, it's barely understandable.  I'm going to a speech therapist for special retraining of my voice.  It's LSVT Loud designed for Parkinson's patients.

Then there's the joint pain which seems to be getting better as I take the meds.  I never had hip pain until the past few months.  Tonight, it's gone, but I'm not sure for how long.

How do I feel about the future?  The apostle Paul said in Romans that with the Holy Spirit's help, we need to be "Joyful in hope and patient in affliction."  I want to be joyful in all this.  I won't be dancing down the street, but with God's help I can be joyful in hope.

 


"God give me the grace to trust you about my Parkinson's Disease"

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I was walking out to the parking lots at the clinic for the MSU School for Human Medicine while talking to my daughter Krista about my diagnosis of having Parkinson’s Disease when she started to cry.  I had everything I could do to not lose it myself. 
 
My appointment had been with a neurologist who specializes in diagnosing and treating the disease.  He said, it was too soon to make a judgement about how advanced the disease had become.  Over the past several months, it had become more and more difficult to get off our soft couch and it seemed like I was becoming a prisoner of our commode to take a poop.  I couldn’t get off without multiple tries.
 
My voice had disintegrated to the point where a once strong tone was reduced to an almost whisper.  This had been developing for several months.  I walked with itty-bitty steps and it was with a real stooped look putting a tension on my back that was untenable.  My primary care provider prescribed 20 physical therapy sessions.  It helped, but wasn’t the answer.
 
The physical therapist asked me if I had ever been evaluated for Parkinson’s.  I hadn’t.  PT was hard for me at times.  But I saw the consequences of long-standing poor posture.  I got a referral to a neurologist from my doctor who did a biopsy on my tongue.  She was very understanding of the symptoms I described.
 
After his diagnosis yesterday, the doctor prescribed carbidopa-levodopa.  If I understand correctly, it restores the dopamine in my neurons which is key in transmitting commands to my body.
 
So what does that mean for me and my wife Gladys?
 
For me, it’s done wonders for my prayer life.  I’m much more sensitive to others with health problems and I pray for them faithfully.  I know I’m getting older and that I’ve been blessed in the ailments I’ve had.  However, the list if growing and this is a big one.
 
I remember what God said in Romans 12:12.  “Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction and faithful in prayer.”
 
My various biopsies of stuff inside my head came back benign.  A lot of people were praying for me.  I intend with the help of God to do the same for others.  More later.

I'm having to digest the news about my carotid arteries

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I've been back from the appointment with my vascular surgeon for a couple of hours.  I've had time to digest a reality that's part of me.  My carotid arteries are hardening, one totally and the other partially.

My surgeon said the doppler taken yesterday showed that my left carotid is still completely blocked and always will be.  My right was described by the doppler techs as less than 50 percent.  But Dr. Controneo said after watching the video he would estimate the flow as being 20 to 30 percent restricted.

What does this mean?  I'll be taking a blood thinner for the rest of my life unless the blockage becomes greater.  They would then put in a stent to clear out the blockage on the right side.

My life goes back to a new normal which will be shaped by my appointment with a neurologist on Monday to check if my brain tumor--a menginoma--has taken on a new twist or if I have Parkinson's as a couple of healthcare providers have suggested as a possibility.

Meanwhile, I'm getting ready to walk outside with my wife.  It's a beautiful Michigan spring day and I need to stay active more than ever.

What's next?  I have no idea, other than I need to keep praying and listening for God and his promise to protect and walk beside me.  Maybe I'll sing a little louder in church this weekend.

I have reason to.  He Is Risen!


Just got done with the doppler on my carotids and learned some stuff

 

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We got home from the doppler test on my left and right carotid arteries.  The unofficial good news is that the blockages haven't gotten any worse.  Of course, my left carotid is completely blocked and that won't change and the right is still letting blood flow through.  Tomorrow, we will find out what percentage of the artery is blocked.  It had been 20 percent.

The other good news is that humans are created with a redundant set of arteries in the neck if one gets blocked.  That's what happened on my left side.  Arteries grew to replace my blocked one and its supplying blood to my face and my eyes.  And then there's the Circle of Willis which takes over when needed.

I don't pretend to understand this all, but I'm impressed with the way God created humans.  There's backup circulation at least for the carotids.  I'm anxious to learn more.

Tomorrow, I have an appointment with the vascular surgeon to make all this official.


I feel my gut tightening up about tomorrow and next week at the vascular surgeon and the neurologist

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My grandson Xavier gave me this coffee mug and I'll be thinking about what it says when I have a doppler taken of my carotid arteries tomorrow morning.  I'll also be thinking about the phrase from the Ephesians chapter one which can be summarized by four words "Remember Who You Are."

And I'll be thinking about it next week when I have a hour-and-a-half neurologist's  appointment to determine if I have Parkinson's Disease.  For me my health continues to be a distraction.

In recent weeks, I have had increasing difficulty in being comfortably mobile because of skeletal stiffness.  My voice has changed from being strong to barely a whisper.  My balance is way off .  It increased with almost twenty visits to a physical therapy clinic.  My gait is not normal with me walk way stooped over.

Back to my carotids, one is completely blocked and the other a few months ago was 20 percent.  Then there's my eyes.  My cornea transplant seems to be working most of the time.  And my glaucoma affects my vision.

What does all this mean as my gut tightens not knowing what the future will bring?  I know that God selected me as his dearly loved son and I'll be grabbing onto that hope.  

Will I continue to write about my health?  You bet.  Doing so, helps me sort out my feelings and to share with my grandkids that people get older and sometimes, they get sick.

 


My newborn grandson Theo talked me out

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March 6, 2019, Wednesday just before lunch

Dear Theo--

Let me introduce myself.  I'm your mother's father which makes me one of your two grandfathers.  Only six people in the whole world can call me grandpa and you're one of them.  Your grandma, your mother's mom, is Gladys.  

You are now a member of our family.  One of the greatest joys I've had in my life is being part of this family.  It's a place where you get a big part of your identity.  You'll always be known as the son of Adam and Krista.  It's also a source of strength and encouragement and laughter.

You and I talked ourselves out the day you came home from the hospital.  We talked about everything, including your parents and your  brothers and sisters and food and countries to visit and cars to drive.  After more than an hour I nodded off with your eyes still open.  You are a good listener.

I love you little man.  Jesus loves you too and so do your parents and siblings, as well as your other grandparents.  You are loved.  Never forget that.  Remember Who You Are. 

We'll talk more later.

Again, welcome to our family which is now made better by your arrival.

Love,

Grandpa Thorp

 


How much do you save by cutting hair at home?

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I needed a haircut.  I don't have much hair left, but a little growth on the top of my head can make me look really shabby.  A few years ago, we bought clippers and my wife started cutting it.  Because of the shape of my head, I have the cue ball look.  But, it looks much better.

Now where do we go for lunch with the money we saved by DIY.


Physical therapy has made me aware of how fast aging happens

 

As we were walking through our almost rural neighborhood, I noticed that I was bending forward more and more and my back was starting to hurt.  It got worse.  And when I went for my annual physical, my primary care provider suggested physical therapy.

Having a really strong desire to fix my awkward walking that made me look like more of an old man than I actually am, I readily agreed to go.  I was hesitant at first not knowing what to expect.

I can see the light at the end of the tunnel where this can be fixed.  Our below zero weather with a horrendous windchill has kept me from any real deep walks, but I'm noticing improvements.  

Walking through the doors of Orthopedic Rehab Specialists in Holt here's what I found.  My concerns about being judged for my age and my lack of physical fitness were unfounded.  The physical therapists and their aides are really up people.  

My main PT is Aaron Holly, a fortyish health care provider, who has been very patient with me and forthcoming about challenges that I might face.  Then there's Joanna, a PT who has been always up and encouraging and very willing to explain what she's doing.

I get a special t-shirt when I "graduate" from my PT treatment.  I'll wear it with pride and as a reminder that I can slow down this aging thing.  I have to keep up the effort.


The last known picture of the six "Moll Sisters" together--including my mother

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My mom--Frieda--had five sisters who grew-up in the Thumb of Michigan.  Looking at this picture makes me wish I would have had iPhone with video.  These women had a real story to tell about growing up on a sugar beet farm from the time the oldest of them was real young to the youngest from the early 1900s to the early 1930s.

Their family of twelve siblings, including six brothers were real heroes who were the grandchildren of immigrants from Germany.  They lived through extreme poverty, backbreaking work from the time they were children and the loss of both parents at a very young age.

They kept the family together after moving to Bay City.  With the deaths of my mom and her brothers and sisters many if not most of the details were lost.

Theirs is a story that would have rivaled Little House on the Prairie.  Their parents--my maternal grandfather and grandmother died way before I was born.


Bartimaeus shows me that I need to change the way I pray for myself and for others

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I spent a lot of time this past year with an old, blind beggar named Bartimaeus who was blind on the road out of Jericho and who had the temerity to shout out to Jesus to heal his blindness.  This past year I read and reread this story because of my rapidly declining vision.  

As I waited to be admitted to the University of Michigan Kresge Eye Center, Pastor David Maier and his wife Pat came off the elevator.  I was taken aback a little when he prayed for God to heal my vision.  I was a fallen away Lutheran and he was the head of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod in Michigan.  He prayed anyways with a great deal of passion.

He prayed for the transplant surgeon and all the people involved in this ever so delicate surgery when somebody died in order for me to have their cornea.

As I face more things going awry in my head and neck such as plugged carotid arteries, a large mass on my tongue and a goiter working on becoming a softball, I can see from this post that I need to pray like Bartimaeus, a plain old beggar on the side of the road in Israel.

I'm not a fancy church guy who can quote much of the Bible from memory.  I grew up on the poorest side of Bay City, right on the river.  I'm not a big contributor to the church, but I know that Jesus loves me.

Pastor Maier connects the dots with this post.  It's practical and real life and it's worth of sharing.

 


Here's why we bought five quarts of plain yogurt yesterday at Meijers

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I started this episode of my weight loss journey tipping the scales at the high 220s and yesterday I showed I was down to 187.  One of my enemies is snacking, particularly after supper.  As I inch towards my goal of 175, I've become more dependent on plain yogurt and frozen fruit pieces to satiate my desire for food.  And this includes pomegranate seeds sprinkled on top.  We also have it at meals.

When you think of plain yogurt, your first reaction might be "yuck."  At first, it seems tasteless but after awhile, you can taste its nuances and layers, especially with the fruit.

After I reach my goal, I know I need to keep it off because of my carotid artery disease.  One is blocked 100 percent and the other less than 20.  I know that if I'm not at peak health for a 72 years old, I would be a prime candidate for a stroke.  That's motivating.

Now, I need to get the exercise in line.